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Having seen the powerful documentary Deliver Us From Evil (required viewing for all Catholics) this past weekend at my local theater, my belief that the Catholic Church is nothing more than a front for NAMBLA has been reinforced tenfold.
The movie follows the carousings of Father Oliver O’Grady as he uses the Catholic cloak to diddle the private parts of young girls and boys, all under the strict supervision and full support of the Catholic Church. Whenever the heat from parents or law enforcement grew a bit too hot, O’Grady’s fellow NAMBLA members such as Cardinal Roger Mahoney (notable to those of us living in Southern California), forgave and blessed the Irish pederast, and sent him on his way to yet another community so that O’Grady could rack up more victims in the name of Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, the Catholic Church, and all those who call themselves Catholics.

Yes. If you are a member of the Catholic Church, and you haven’t had your head buried in the sand for the last 20 years, then you well comprehend that you are members in a faith based around fucking little girls and boys–in fact, if you do nothing to prevent it–to at least bring it to light–you are complicit in it. All you are accomplishing is the offering up of your money to ensure the church retains enough power, political and financial, to push aside all complaints of child sexual abuse. If you do nothing but go to Mass, confess your sins, and say some fucking hail-Mary’s, then you can sleep well at night knowing that your financial and spiritual support allow tens of thousands of priests around the world to suck, fuck, and generally sodomize hundreds of thousands and probably millions of children.

But hey, if you have no issue (and by “no issue” I mean that you do absolutely nothing but be a “good, church-going Catholic”) with the idea of this man…

…sticking his dick into your child, then please continue what you’re doing. Give your money to pedophile protectors like Roger Mahoney. Give them more power. Allow Mahoney and his ilk to shuffle more child molesters to churches throughout the community to spread his seed (and by seed, I mean his sperm) of rot on other unsuspecting families and children.

Because that’s all Roger Mahoney did. Whenever the spotlight became too bright on child rapist O’Grady, Mahoney would simply ship the monster to another parish 50 miles away. This happened over and over and over, despite the fact that O’Grady’s superiors promised abused families, in exchange that they wouldn’t press charges, that the Irish priest would be moved to an all male monastary, presumably so that he and other Catholic sodomites could diddle and dork each other all day without harming small children. Nope, Mahoney just moved him into another town, another neighborhood, and more child prey.

Why does this happen? Why does the Catholic Church allow… Scratch that. Why does the Catholic Church encourage priests to fuck little kids? Because the individual hierarchy–bishops, cardinals, etc.–want as much power as possible at the expense of people’s lives and souls.

If Mahoney, and all those who protect pedophiles in the church, believes in a Christian god, then he and they must understand that eternal hellfire awaits them for what they have done and what they continue to do, and all for fleeting power here and now in this world.

What is more telling is the fact that the Church does so much to cover up the tens of thousands of sexual abuse allegations. They attempt to cover them up to their clueless parishioners. They attempt to cover them up to the authorities. That is an appalling and detestable stance for a faith-based organization to take, and it’s something I have never truly been able to grasp. Yet it all comes back to power, and Mahoney wants it the most. He wants to become the first American Pope, and he’ll do whatever is necessary to make certain that happens, including that he ensures the sodomizing of thousands of children to come.

On a more basic level, why does this happen? I’m not repeating the same question I asked earlier. This is a new question leveled squarely at priests who enjoy screwing boys and girls. Why do they do it? Why does there seem to exist a disproportionately large pedophile community within the Catholic Church?

The main reason, I believe, is the fact that priests within the church are not allowed to enter into wedded bliss. They are apparently required to live a chaste and intemerate life, meaning no drugs, no marriage, no carnal relations, and certainly no baby fucking. And yet, the Church continues to court, encourage, and protect men who like to fondle the undeveloped genitalia of little girls and boys. If those in the order were only allowed to marry, I would be shocked if priest pedophilia weren’t slashed by 90 percent at least. It’s amazing what a nice bout of regular copulation with a woman (or man if you’re a gay priest) of age will do for a man. Hell, it’s almost like neutering them. They’ll no longer find the need to recklessly lash out sexually with whomever is the most easily accessible and vulnerable prey. It would be an extraordinary revolution within the Catholic Church.

But it won’t happen, and this is why. The Catholic Church cares more for money and power than the spiritual sanity of their followers. I’m sure there are many “good” Catholics out there who scoff at this notion, and who bristle at the idea of altering traditions and doctrine within the Church. Some claim that priests don’t marry in order to ape the life and teachings of Jesus and his priesthood. To those I say, you’re mindless idiots.

Catholic priests were once allowed to wed. In fact, several popes were married. Additionally, some of Jesus’ disciples had wives, so whoever tells you otherwise is either lying or simply stupid. As I said, the truth lies in greed and the desire for more power. Centuries ago, the upper echelons of the Catholic hierarchy became annoyed with the passing of money and land from priests to their heirs. As a result, the Church altered doctrine to prohibit any man entering into the priesthood the right to marry, thereby siphoning all money the priests had to the church after their death.

The end result? The nurturing of legions of pederasts into the folds of the Catholic Church.

Father Oliver O’Grady’s first victim was a little girl. He raped her. He ruined her life. His next victim was a little boy. He raped him and he ruined his life as well. When you’re the follower of a faith whose leaders believe that fucking a little girl isn’t as bad as fucking a little boy, you must take a step back and examine why you are a member of that organization. To me it seems you have only two choices: Leave the Church forever, or fight it that it should change its pedophile advocating ways.

With nearly a thousand open individual criminal investigations delving into Catholic priest sexual abuse in Los Angeles County alone, imagine how many more there are around the country–around the world. If that doesn’t affect you, I’ll leave you with this quote from the film, Deliver Us From Evil offered as a wake up call to those who simply can’t wrap their minds around horrors such as these. Excuse me for paraphrasing, but this is fairly accurate.

“It is difficult for poeple to fathom what actually transpires during these molestations, to imagine that a grown man would actually insert his penis into the vagina of an infant.”

Father O’Grady’s youngest victim was a nine month-old baby girl.

 

 

His Eminence Roger Cardinal Mahony at the Religious Education Congress in Anaheim in March 2006
A former priest molested kids in California parishes. Now he talks in a chilling documentary.

Jesse Hamlin, Chronicle Staff Writer

Wednesday, October 25, 2006
He was the closest thing to God they knew. Bob Jyono can still picture the priest he and his wife, Maria, called Ollie, a family friend who often spent the night in their Lodi home, saying his morning prayers with a Bible in his hands.

“And all during the night, he’s molesting my daughter — not molesting, raping her! — at 5 years old,” wails Jyono in “Deliver Us From Evil.” It’s a devastating documentary about Oliver O’Grady, the notorious pedophile priest who sexually abused children, including a 9-month-old baby, in a string of Central California towns for 20 years — and the Catholic bishops who moved him from parish to unsuspecting parish, allegedly covering up his crimes.

“For God’s sake! How did this happen?” Jyono cries.

That’s one of the questions posed by this wrenching film, which opens at Bay Area theaters Friday. “Deliver Us From Evil” has rekindled long-standing accusations that Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles, a powerful church leader who was bishop of the Stockton Diocese from 1980-85, knew O’Grady was a pedophile but failed to keep him away from children.

Directed by former TV news producer Amy Berg, the film is built around chilling interviews with the defrocked priest, who was deported to his native Ireland in 2000 after serving seven years of a 14-year prison sentence prison for committing four “lewd and lascivious” act with two young brothers. He speaks in a lilting Celtic voice that sounds like Mrs. Doubtfire, making him even creepier. He dispassionately recounts his heinous acts as if describing someone else. He wears a sly smile as he says what arouses him: “How about children in swimsuits? I’d say, yeah. How about children in underwear? I’d say, yeah. How about children naked? Uh-huh, yeah.”

Berg spent eight days interviewing O’Grady in Dublin, where he moved freely about the city, walking through parks where children played, pondering his obsession as he sits in an empty church.

“Basically what I want to say is, it should not have happened,” says the fallen priest in the film. He told Mahony of his “situation,” he says, and “I should’ve been removed and attended to. And he should have then attended to the people I’d harmed. I wish he’d done that.”

He writes letters of apology to his victims and invites them to Ireland for a conciliatory reunion (“God speed, and hope to see you real soon,” he says with a wink).

In the film, another victim, Adam M., reads the letter in disbelief. “I could kill his mother,” says the man, pointing to the San Andreas rectory where O’Grady sodomized him. It was Adam M.’s mother who brought the priest into the family home. As she says in the film, “He was the wolf and I was the gatekeeper, and I let the wolf through the gate.”

O’Grady later retracted the invitations and, according to Berg, has fled Ireland in the wake of publicity about the movie. His whereabouts are unknown, a frightening development to those he abused decades ago, who are still haunted by him.

“There’s not a day that I don’t suffer from what he did to me,” said Ann Jyono, a 40-year-old insurance agent, on the phone from her Southern California home.

Jyono says O’Grady began molesting her when she was 5 and kept at it until she was 12. Jyono didn’t tell her folks for years, until O’Grady was arrested in 1993. She testified at his criminal trial and in a 1998 civil case that cost the Stockton diocese $7 million — a small fraction of what the Catholic Church has paid out in scores of sexual abuse cases that have scandalized the institution. Jyono’s suit was thrown out because of the statute of limitations.

Seeing and hearing O’Grady again, even on film, “was traumatic. I felt like I was 5 again,” said Jyono, who appears in “Deliver Us From Evil.” “I was still so afraid of that man. At the same time, I was pleased that his psychotic, narcissistic personality allowed him to tell the truth and show how psychotic he is. I was proud of him: He finally did it, he finally said the words. … His craziness and his evil were captured onscreen.”

The film also points to the culpability of church officials, like Mahony, who has been named in numerous civil suits by victims of priestly abuse. “They banked on our silence and our shame,” Jyono said. “That’s how they got away with it for so long.”

She and the others were reluctant to tell their stories on camera. But after meeting with Berg, they came to trust her and agreed to participate, painful as it was.

The director had produced stories about the clergy sexual-abuse scandal for CBS and CNN, including a piece about O’Grady that she said left a lot of questions in her mind. She got hold of his phone number and called. To her amazement, he agreed to meet with her. She flew to Ireland, had a series of conversations with him and then flew home to Los Angeles. About five months later, O’Grady agreed to speak on camera.

“He wanted to tell his story,” Berg, 36, said the other day in a San Francisco hotel suite. “A lot of times I listened in disbelief. But I took it in and allowed it to come onto the video. It’s an important story, and I had to stay distanced from it. You could become emotional sitting in front of a pedophile for eight days. It’s not a pleasant thing. So I had to stay professional and let him talk. I was kind of shocked by his candor, and then by his inability to understand what he did, the impact of it.”

O’Grady spoke about his transgressions “like he got a flat tire on the way to work, and he turned in the wrong direction,” Berg continued, “like it was just an occurrence, something that happened; it’s not something he did.” She wants him to watch the movie so he can see what he wrought, but she doesn’t know where to send it.

Because of police reports, depositions and other documents, Berg has no doubt that the bishops overseeing O’Grady knew about his actions and chose to cover them up in order to avoid scandal and a stain on their careers.

In 1984, a Stockton police investigation into sexual abuse allegations against O’Grady was reportedly closed after diocese officials promised to remove the priest from any contact with children. Instead, he was reassigned to a parish about 50 miles east, in San Andreas, where he continued to molest kids. Not long after, Mahony was promoted to archbishop of Los Angeles, the largest Catholic diocese in the country. In the film, O’Grady says Mahony was “very supportive and very compassionate” and that “another situation had been smoothly handled.”

William Hodgman, the Los Angeles deputy district attorney in charge of prosecuting pedophile priests, told the New York Times that the movie “will fuel ongoing considerations as to whether Cardinal Mahony and others engaged in criminal activity.”

Mahony, whose taped depositions in civil cases in 1997 and 2004 appear in the documentary, has denied knowing O’Grady was a serial child molester. Church officials declined to be interviewed for the film, and they say any suggestion that the cardinal is the subject of a criminal investigation is irresponsible. The cardinal’s spokesman, Tod Tamberg, has seen “Deliver Us From Evil” and called it “an obvious anti-church hit piece.”

In a phone interview with The Chronicle, Tamberg said, “Everyone should be saddened by the kind of emotional and spiritual devastation that these kind of child molesters can wreak on individuals and families. That said, this movie is incredibly biased and omits many facts that would’ve changed the assumption the movie makes.”

The movie, Tamberg added, “is chock full of attorneys and expert witnesses who make millions of dollars every year in abuse litigation against the church. It’s a big advertisement for them.”

That’s not how Nancy Sloan sees it. She says O’Grady first abused her in 1976 at age 11, and she’s never fully recovered.

“The 11-year-old in me is still afraid of him,” said Sloan, 41, a Fairfield nurse who appears in the film, during a phone interview. O’Grady is the “sick individual” who sexually abused her, Sloan said — in his Dodge Duster on Highway 12 two minutes from her home, as well as in a Lodi swimming pool, in the church and rectory. He even fondled her in the state Capitol, which she entered for the first time in 26 years to speak on behalf of a 2003 bill temporarily extending the statute of limitations on sex crimes by clerics.

But “as sad as it may seem, I have felt compassion for him. I have to remember that at some point, he was a little boy who was molested by a priest, and molested by his (older) brother.” She wonders how that broke him, why he didn’t become a survivor who tried to help others rather than someone who “went down the wrong path and turned into a deviant.”

Her anger is mostly directed at the monsignors and bishops who didn’t stop him, who told her parents she must’ve misinterpreted the priest’s actions.

“If a miracle could happen, I would love for them to be given 24 hours as a survivor,” Sloan said. “To have the nightmare that I had two nights ago, waking up over and over and thinking O’Grady was back, and did I lock the door. ‘Why didn’t I lock the door? O’Grady is coming in.’ I’d like for them to have compassion for survivors and not just give lip service.”

Sloan still feels sick whenever she sees a Dodge Duster. “You don’t see too many of them anymore; thank God for small favors,” she said with a laugh. She’s no longer a Catholic and doesn’t even know what that means. “Do I believe in God? Yes. Do I believe in Jesus? Yes. Do I believe in the Eucharist? Yes. Do I believe in the hierarchy of the church? No. Do I believe in the pope and that he’s infallible? Hell no.”

Ann Jyono still goes to church sometimes and cries. The hatred she feels for O’Grady is still a heavy burden, she said. “I could forgive the man if he would commit himself for life to an institution for adults only. I need to know that I don’t have to wake up every night with a fright, wondering where he is or if he’s hurting other kids.”

She’d like to see Cardinal Mahony removed from his post and get the same treatment as citizens who don’t wear the collar. “If my neighbor’s son raped a little girl and ran home and told his mother, and she gave him a plane ticket and money and sent him off, she would be arrested for aiding and abetting her son. I just don’t understand why the justice system has failed us.”

Then there’s her father, a Japanese American Buddhist who converted to Catholicism to marry her Irish-born mother. He no longer believes in God. “The devil snuck into the church and stole my dad’s soul, and I want it back,” Jyono said the other day, crying.

Speaking out in this film has provided some solace.

“I finally found my voice and can talk about it. My father feels like I’m not a victim anymore, that I’m a survivor, on the road to healing. It may take a long, long time, but I think maybe I see light at the end of the tunnel, where I saw only darkness before.”
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Pedophile priest film vies for documentary prize

By Gregg KildayThu Nov 2, 5:28 AM ET

“Deliver Us From Evil,” which examines the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic church, and “Iraq in Fragments,” in which Iraqis recount life during wartime, are among the films nominated for the 22nd annual Distinguished Documentary Achievement Awards.

The other three nominated feature documentaries, announced Wednesday by the International Documentary Assn., were: the political-campaign saga “Can Mr. Smith Get to Washington Anymore?,” the Broadway expose “Showbusiness: A Season to Remember” and the displaced-musician story “Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars.”

The short documentaries nominated were: “The Blood of Yingzhou District,” “The Diary of Immaculee,” “Angel’s Fire” (Fuego de Angel), “The Short History of Sweet Potato Pie & How it Became a Flying Saucer,” and “The Wild Sheep, and the Fox and Love.”

The winners will be announced during a ceremony at the Directors Guild of America Theater in Los Angeles on December 8.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter

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“Missed opportunity” doesn’t even begin to describe the debacle that the Islamic world has yet again perpetrated in the name of their prophet Muhammad.

Provided to the Muslim faithful, courtesy of the major representation of Christian faith embodied in Catholicism and specifically the Pope, is the perfect occasion to demonstrate to the rest of the planet and particularly the west, how they can truly represent themselves in a civilized manner by taking this opportunity to protest peacefully their chagrin at the perceived slight by Benedict XVI.

Instead, they riot. Muslims throughout the Mideast and southeast Asia have taken to the streets, committed violence against others–particularly Christians. A jihad has already become inevitable according to many radical Islamists, including Al Qaeda.

Perhaps the Pope should have used a little more discernment before reciting the ancient text where from he drew words denouncing Islam and particularly the prophet Muhammad as “evil,” because as expected, the Muslim world has grossly over reacted to an intent that may or may not have even been there in the first place. Even more, a little spiritual discernment probably would have benefited the Pope far more than intellectual discernment. I’m reaching wildly here, but if the Pope would have consulted his boss first, if he would have really thought about the torment that could be caused as a result of his actions, I think he might have approached the subject differently. Did he not recall the anarchy that ensued after political cartoons depicting Muhammad appeared in European newspapers?

Regardless, Muslims have yet again proven their readiness to embrace violence as a means to denounce those who give them slight. It benefits them little, while continuing to alienate their faith and ideals even further to the western world. It makes me sad for them.

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Pope’s apology fails to quell Muslim anger

Mon Sep 18, 1:01 PM ET

Pope Benedict XVI’s apology for remarks seen as critical of Islam, have failed to quell anger in the Muslim world as Iraqis burned him in effigy and Al-Qaeda in Iraq vowed to “smash the cross.”

Despite appeals for calm from Islamic and Western leaders, protests were held from Indonesia to Iraq over the pope’s citing of a medieval text last week that criticised some teachings of the Prophet Mohammed as “evil and inhuman.”

The leader of the world’s 1.1 billion Roman Catholics said he was “deeply sorry” Sunday for the offense caused by his remarks and the Vatican launched a diplomatic offensive to explain to Muslim countries his position on Islam.

A handful of Muslim groups welcomed the 79-year-old pope’s apology but it failed to stem the tide of anger in many Muslim nations.

Mohammed Habib of Egypt’s opposition Muslim Brotherhood said they considered the apology a retraction of the pope’s statement, but some Egyptian lawmakers demanded diplomatic ties with the Vatican be suspended.

The powerful All India Muslim Personal Law Board based in the northern city of Lucknow called for an end to protests against the Vatican but demonstrations were held elsewhere.

In Jakarta, some 100 hardliners rallied outside the Holy See’s mission in the Indonesian capital, waving a banner depicting the Vatican as an “axis of Satan.”

Some 150 protestors from a youth party marched through the Pakistani Kashmiri capital Muzaffarabad chanting “Death to Pope” and burned him in effigy.

The pope was also burned in effigy in this southern Iraqi port city where hundreds of Iraqis staged a demonstration on Monday and called for an apology.

The 500 protestors, followers of Ayatollah Mahmud al-Hassani, a mystical Shiite Muslim cleric, also burned German and American flags and called for the pope to be tried in an international court.

Al-Qaeda in Iraq warned in an Internet statement Monday it would wage jihad, or holy war, until the West is defeated.

“We say to the servant of the cross (the pope): wait for defeat… We say to infidels and tyrants: wait for what will afflict you. We continue our jihad,” said the statement attributed to the Mujahedeen consultative council.

“We will smash the cross,” it added, and “conquer Rome.”

Another armed group linked to Al-Qaeda, Ansar al-Sunna (Partisans of the Precepts of the Prophet), denounced the pope as “Satan’s hellhound.”

In Tehran, Iran’s supreme leader Ali Khamenei compared the pope’s remarks to caricatures published in a Danish newspaper last year deemed insulting to the Prophet Mohammed. The cartoons set off deadly protests in the Muslim world.

“The issue of insulting cartoons and remarks of some politicians about Islam are different links in the conspiracy of the crusaders and the pope’s remarks are the latest links in this,” Khamenei said.

In Jordan, a government spokesman said the pope’s apology was a “positive step in the right direction” but “we expect more steps.”

Morroco’s King Mohammed VI, who recalled his ambassador to the Vatican, called on the pontiff to demonstrate his respect for Muslim beliefs. “I’m speaking to you as head of the Catholic Church to ask you to have the same respect for Islam that you vow to other beliefs,” he said.

In the Gulf, newspapers continued to slam the pope with Saudi Arabia’s Al-Yom saying his comments were more than “an ordinary blunder requiring an apology.”

The Vatican sought meanwhile to reach out to Muslims.

Vatican Secretary of State Tarcisio Bertone told the Corriere della Sera that Vatican ambassadors had been asked to explain to political and religious authorities in Muslim countries the full text of the pope’s speech, which they said had been taken out of context and “heavily manipulated.”

Other appeals for calm came from the European Commission, which condemned “disproportionate” reaction to the pope’s remarks, and French President Jacques Chirac, who warned against “anything that increases tensions between peoples or religions.”

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Part 7 • False hopes

How the insurgency operates and views the world. Five Iraqi women are released but Jill must make another video.

| Staff writers of The Christian Science Monitor
(J.C.) It was late January the next time we moved. Hot and tired of traveling, I threw up all over myself. They didn’t know that I’d always been prone to car sickness.

“Do you need a doctor? Are you sick? We can bring you a doctor,” said Abu Rasha, my No. 2 captor, who was driving. Again and again, I saw that their beliefs would allow them to deprive me of my freedom and kill Alan, yet also lead them to express sincere concern over my health and well-being as their hostage.

When we finally came to a stop I was led, stinking, into a new house – the sixth place I’d been, in the three weeks I’d been held. It wouldn’t take much to prompt a move: a helicopter overhead, wild dogs barking at night, a US patrol in the vicinity. At the time, I thought the house was south of Baghdad. The US military now says it was near Abu Ghraib.

Once inside, they steered me directly into the bathroom, and I stripped off my soiled clothes.

The house was so new that the mujahideen were still building it around me. No family lived here. This was a house built by Abu Nour, my lead captor, solely for the use of the mujahideen. It was a meeting house, a bomb factory, and, for me, a jail.

In my head, I called it “the clubhouse.”

Here there were no women and children to serve as buffers between me and my captors – or to witness my eventual fate.

I’d felt some measure of safety in the presence of the mujahideen families. That might have been an illusion. In any case, now it was gone.

As the weeks of my captivity accumulated, I felt physical and mental stress begin to mount.

The inactivity was claustrophobic. The psychological poking and prodding of my captors – who knew so little about Americans that they were shocked I wasn’t blond – sometimes made me feel like an animal in a zoo.

Constant adrenaline crashed up against chronic fatigue. I’d lie down at night, and my eyes would feel swollen. I’d close my eyelids and it would seem as if they weren’t big enough to go around my eyeballs.

Sometimes I would think about people back home and I would feel a little better. My grandparents are Catholic and they go to Mass every day. I would figure what time it was in the US and would think, “I bet they’re praying for me right now. I bet they’re saying, ‘Let’s pray for our granddaughter, Jill Carroll.’ “

If it was early morning in America, I would imagine my mom, dad, and twin sister, Katie, waking up. If it was a little later I would think, “They’re having their morning meeting at the Monitor. Maybe they’re talking about me.”

That was my only escape.

At first in the clubhouse, I was happy to sit alone in my bedroom and not be bothered.

Between moments of terror, throughout my captivity were long hours doing nothing. Here, I didn’t want to look around the room too much, because I wanted to save the newness, and the interest of looking at new things as long as I could. After fear, boredom was my tormentor, my constant enemy.

I’d think, “I’m going to spend today looking at the heater. And then tomorrow, I’ll sit in a different part of the room, and it’ll look different.” I’d stare at flies for hours.

It sounds crazy now, but then it seemed normal. If you looked at everything all at once, it became familiar and boring really fast.

I sang camp songs to myself, and songs that Mom used to sing to me. I spun fantasies of US marines rescuing me. I ruminated over old boyfriends and choices I’d made. I deeply questioned my decision to come to Iraq. I had devoted a year in Jordan to studying Arabic and working at an English-language newspaper, slowly learning my craft. For what? To spend my last days under the thumb of the bleepin’ muj? If I ever got out, I decided I’d never leave the US again.

At night, I would think hard about Katie, sending her mental messages: ‘I’m OK. Don’t worry. Can you feel me, Katie?’ In my head, I’d write letters to Dad, in North Carolina, telling him about my days. I’d imagine him hugging me and hugging me in the doorway, telling me everything was OK.

I spent a lot of time staring at my toes, and wondering if I was slowly going around the bend.

After several days at the clubhouse, the guards asked me if I wanted to watch them make dinner. Then they let me watch a little TV. Eventually, they let me pace the length of the house, about 15 steps, and help wash dishes and prepare meals. I was overjoyed with these activities after so many hours spent doing nothing.

(Photograph)
THE CLUBHOUSE: This house near Abu Ghraib was one of at least six locations where Jill Carroll was kept hostage. The US military says soldiers raided it in May.
View interior photos of ‘the clubhouse’ in our interactive map.

US MARINE CORPS

Access to sunlight became the most important new benefit, though. It poured into the sparse sitting room where my guards slept and where we all ate.

I was desperate for light after painful days in dim rooms in the Abu Ghraib house with my now-departed female minder, Um Ali. I had been handed off to a different cell under Abu Nour, to a different set of guards.

One of the guards at this new house, who had himself spent time in prison, seemed to understand the way I felt. One morning before breakfast, he tied back the thin curtains.

“Sun,” he said smiling and gesturing at the bright streams pouring in through the etched glass windows.

I sat on the ground in the sunbeam and closed my eyes. It penetrated my eyelids and warmed my face.

By this point, I had learned much about the way the mujahideen operated. To me, at least, some of their tactics were surprisingly clever.

Take transportation. Men with beards, and cars with only one or two men, drew too much attention from patrols and at checkpoints. So they shaved their beards and drove around as families, kids and women included. They played Shiite music. As insurgents, they knew how to not look like an insurgent.

(Photograph)
ILLUSTRATION BY JILLIAN TAMAKI

They have the home-field advantage. As Abu Nour, the leader, told me more than once: “I can go out, plant my bomb, and go back and have a homemade dinner with my wife. What are American soldiers going to do? They go back [to their base] and do not have good food or get to see their family.”

Abu Nour (“Ink Eyes”) began coming to see me almost every day. Clearly, he felt freer to visit the clubhouse than the other places I’d been held. It was during one of these visits that he’d mentioned Margaret Hassan, and I’d hysterically begged for the guards to use a gun to kill me, not a knife.

At the clubhouse, he also appeared eager to have me “interview” him (see story). He seemed to have begun to view me as a messenger – an idea I had been pushing, hoping it would give them a reason to set me free.

My hands always shook when I did these “interviews.” Like all interactions with my captors, they felt like mine fields, or chess games.

Among other things, Abu Nour said that some people joined the mujahideen because they were angry about the treatment of prisoners in Abu Ghraib prison or raids on their homes at night. Many enlisted following a battle they considered a great victory – the April 2004 fight for Fallujah, a city west of Baghdad in the Anbar Province.

Abu Nour added that too many of these new recruits had impure motives. That, he said, is why they lost Fallujah to US forces in November 2004.

“A good mujahid enters the war so [that] if he dies he goes to heaven,” Abu Nour insisted.

Secular insurgents were useful allies, but wouldn’t be allowed to take part in the Iraqi government after the mujahideen’s final victory, he said. Sunni politicians participating in the current US-backed government were traitors to Islam and should be killed.

My captors would laugh, for example, when Adnan al-Dulaimi would appear on TV – either when he was pleading for my release or as part of a group of politicians trying to form a new government. I had gone to interview Mr. Dulaimi when they seized me in front of his political headquarters in Baghdad.

[In a press conference on Jan. 20, Dulaimi said: “By kidnapping her, you are insulting me. You’re insulting the work that I’ve been doing for Iraq…. release her….” Nine days later he issued another tearful public appeal for Jill’s release, which was featured in the Monitor’s Iraqi media campaign in February and March.]

(Photograph)
ADNAN AL-DULAIMI: The Iraqi politician on Jan. 20 at a press briefing calling for Jill Carroll’s release.
AP Photo/Hadi Mizban

“Look, Jill. Ha, ha. There’s your ‘friend’ Dulaimi,” they scoffed each time he appeared. “Oh, please, please free Jill! Ha, ha, ha, ha.” They mocked him.

Within minutes of my capture, I had suspected Dulaimi, the head of the Iraqi Accordance Front, a Sunni political party. The kidnappers were waiting for us when we left his office. They must have known about my appointment ahead of time.

During one of these talks at the “clubhouse,” Abu Nour said that Dulaimi had been to see him that week. Dulaimi had begged Ink Eyes to let me go. Later, the guards told me that Dulaimi had been back again. Dulaimi said, “Please, please let her go. The [US] soldiers are threatening to arrest my sons. Tell me where Jill is. Let her go.” (See related story)

My captors were angry about being labeled “terrorists.” But the deaths of innocent people caused by their activities – such as the murder of my interpreter, Alan Enwiya – didn’t taint the purity of their jihad.

“Sometimes when we try to hit the American soldier or Iraqi soldier, sometimes we kill women and children in this operation,” said Abu Nour at one point. “We don’t want to …, but this is war.”

Periodically, Abu Nour would tell me people were calling for my release. He would never say whether this was good or bad.

Throughout my ordeal, my captors would make oblique references to what I later discovered were organized appeals on my behalf. For example, Abu Nour wanted to know if I knew the leader of Hamas, the Palestinian militant group. I thought it was another test of my character. Later, I learned Hamas had issued a statement condemning the kidnapping of civilians.

When my father and mother made their first televised statements, Abu Rasha said, “Your father and mother say, ‘Hello’ to you.”

“Very good man, good man, your father,” he said.

It was clear that whatever my parents had said on TV had made a good impression.

One day Abu Nour arrived, and said that five women detainees had been released. This was important, and good news, he said.

(Photograph)
GOING HOME: Two of the five Iraqi women released from a Bagdhad detention center were driven home on Jan. 26. US officials said the release was not related to the demands of Jill’s captors.
Hadi Mizban/AP

“This is Step 1,” he said. “Now we have to go to Step 2.”

He wanted me to make another video, and ask for the release of all Iraqi women prisoners.

I was crushed. Another video meant days or weeks of waiting for it to air, then waiting for a reply. The black-eyed leader – someone who I thought never saw me as a person, despite the chocolates he brought from Baghdad – now thought he had something really valuable. The last thing they were going to do was let me go.

It wasn’t until later that I figured the release of the five women had helped by making it harder to justify killing me.

(P.G.) Five Iraqi female detainees were released on Jan. 26, along with some 450 male prisoners. While US officials denied this was in response to Jill’s captors’ demands, her family saw it as a hopeful sign.

But four days later, Jill’s twin sister, Katie, got a disturbing call from Amelia Newcomb, deputy foreign editor, who served as the Monitor’s liaison to the family. The kidnappers had released another video, said Newcomb; and on this one Jill was crying.

Immediately Katie assumed the worst – that this was evidence her sister was being mistreated. She snapped on her television, and, indeed, saw a picture of a sobbing Jill. And in an instant, she felt much better.

Jill was faking, Katie thought.

She knew her sister. She knew that when Jill really cried it was like the Nile at the crest of a flood. The tears would come so hard, Jill wouldn’t even be able to see, if she didn’t wipe them away.

But this was different. This was … restrained. Maybe the kidnappers were coaching Jill. Maybe she wasn’t being physically mistreated.

Katie wasn’t the only family member to take heart from the ostensibly disturbing video. Mary Beth Carroll didn’t think her daughter was crying, either. Clearly, Jill was being fed – her cheeks weren’t sunken – and she was dressed in a neat hijab, which seemed in some manner a token of respect.

Nine days later, a third video of Jill appeared on a Kuwaiti television station. This time, for the first time, her voice could be heard. “I am with the mujahideen,” she said. “I sent you a letter written by my hand, but you wanted more evidence, so we are sending you this letter now to prove I am with the mujahideen.”

On Feb. 10, a day later, the owner of the Kuwaiti television station said that sources close to the kidnappers had told him there was a Feb. 26 deadline. Two whole weeks! The US had that long to release all Iraqi women from its prisons, or else. To Mary Beth, that meant Jill’s safety was guaranteed for the next 16 days.

The day after the video came out, Mary Beth woke up in a good mood. After the daily worries she and the rest of the family had experienced, this was almost like being on vacation, she thought.

 

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My god, but this is a telling article from last weeks LATimes.  Almost as surprising:  It was produced from that liberally slanted publication.

Anyway, let’s take a look at this piece by staff writer, Sam Quinones.

Quartet

6 + 4 = 1 Tenuous Existence

An illegal immigrant couple with six children were already living in poverty. Then the quadruplets arrived. They’re still in a daze.

By Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
July 28, 2006

Of course, the sub-headline already reveals that the family is here illegally, but the beginning of the article approaches the Magdaleno family’s predicament without revealing that information for several paragraphs, which is actually quite effective.

With two teenage daughters at home and triplets still in diapers, Angela Magdaleno’s family overflowed from a one-bedroom apartment in South Los Angeles that they strained to afford.

Diapers had to be changed 15 times a day, feedings held every three hours. One triplet, 3-year-old Alfredo Jr., needed special attention because he was born with liquid on his brain and partially paralyzed.
Even simple events — like going to the store — required complex orchestration.

And that was before the quadruplets arrived.

On July 6, Magdaleno gave birth to two boys and two girls, drawing national media attention as a bewildered mother of 10 (with nine living at home). Now, she and her husband, Alfredo Anzaldo, 44, must figure out how to provide for everyone on Anzaldo’s maximum pay of $400 a week as a carpet installer.
Angela is obviously not happy at all to have brought four more children into her already bloated family.

As cameras flashed two weeks ago, capturing the 40-year-old mother with her newest progeny, she appeared dazed, even morose. They’d have to leave their $600-a-month apartment for something bigger. They’d have to buy a minivan with room for four more car seats.

“I was afraid,” she said. “I still feel like I can’t believe it.”

U.S. immigrants’ stories often are about reinvention and newfound prosperity, about leaving behind poverty and limitations.

But that is not Magdaleno’s story.

Both Magdaleno and Anzaldo are illegal immigrants, settled for years in an immigrant enclave. Magdaleno has the same number of children as her parents, who were peasant farmers in Mexico. Like her parents, she is living in poverty and struggling to provide for her family.

Angela, along with her husband Anzaldo, have ensured that their peasant lifestyle and culture in Mexico be brought with them here to Los Angeles.  Come here illegally, do nothing to improve your way of life in the process, struggle to support your family, and produce more children that will place even greater stress on lives.

“It’s not sweet,” said her 36-year-old sister, Alejandra. “It’s very sad. The life for girls back there in Mexico is the same as the one Angela has now. They marry and have children, and that’s their lives.”

That was Alejandra, Angela’s sister.  You will want to read further to discover her fate.

Neither Magdaleno nor her husband speaks English, though she has been in the United States 22 years and he 28. Even her teenage daughters speak mostly Spanish; their English vocabulary is limited.

Jesus Christ!  Twenty-two and 28 years and they still haven’t learned English?  None?!  What’s even more frightening is the fact that their teenage children barely speak English as well.  This is very sad.  To me, it speaks volumes on Mexican familial culture–how improving oneself is simply sneaking across the border and continuing a genealogy that one was trying to escape in the first place.

Here in the land of the free though, one can leach off the taxpayers of the state and the country.

Yet all of Magdaleno’s 10 children are U.S. citizens. The triplets receive subsidized school lunches. All the youngsters have had their healthcare bills covered by Medi-Cal, the state and federal healthcare program for the poor.

Alfredo Jr. had been hospitalized all his life until recently. He’s had three state-funded brain operations and will require several more, the family said. The couple receive $700 in monthly Social Security payments to help with his medical needs.

“I thank this country that they gave me Medi-Cal,” Magdaleno said. “There’s nothing like that in Mexico.”

Yes, there’s nothing like that in Mexico.  Thank god they’ve come here to have litters of children.  I love it when my tax dollars, and yours, are vacuumed up in the illegal alien black hole.

And before anyone becomes overly heated because I have no heart for Alfredo’s condition, please forge ahead further into the article to discover how the triplets were conceived.

Magdaleno’s existence contrasts sharply with that of her younger siblings, who followed her to Los Angeles but then left. They have settled in Lexington, Ky., had no more than two children each and built better lives than they had known before. Four bought houses. Their children speak English fluently.

Magdaleno’s sisters struggle in vain to understand her. “She still thinks like people in Mexico — that’s what I think,” said her 38-year-old sister, Justina. “You have to think first of your living children instead of thinking of having more.”

As stated, this is Angela’s sister.  It may be difficult to believe for those of us living in Southern California, and particularly Los Angeles, but this is a Latina making this statement.  She used to be illegal, but she applied for legal status, becoming an American citizen years ago.  Fuck anyone who claims anti-illegal immigration supporters are racist.  Angela’s sister was illegal, and she makes statements that illegal immigration activists claim are racist.

Magdaleno struggles to explain. She said she was wearing a birth-control patch to keep from getting pregnant, then took it off when it made her nauseated.

“I didn’t want any more children,” said Magdaleno, who used fertility drugs to conceive the triplets but said she did not use them in the case of the quadruplets.

I do not believe that statement at all.

“Four is too many. I’m still trying to believe this happened to me.”

SURPRISE!  Not.

Angela Magdaleno’s story began as many Mexican immigrant stories do: in a village where work was scarce and wages were low.

She grew up in Los Positos, in the central Mexican state of Jalisco, the eldest of 10. For girls, life consisted of hard work, little schooling, no birth control and thus, said Alejandra, raising “all the children God gives you.”
Angela and Justina left school at fifth grade to work in fields and tortilla shops to help support their family.

In 1984, hoping to make more money to send home, the girls were the first Magdalenos to cross illegally into the United States. Angela was 19. The sisters found work in sewing factories, and apartments in the growing Latino immigrant communities of South Los Angeles.

Over the years, their eight siblings followed them.

Angela married, had two daughters, then divorced.

Wait!  You can’t do that.  You’re Catholic!  Bad!  Bad!

In 1990, she met Anzaldo, an immigrant from the state of Nayarit, Mexico, who had three daughters from relationships with two women — one in the U.S. and one in Mexico. Anzaldo was working in auto shops.

To me, it just sounds like Anzaldo is a horny mother-fucker, and again, not a very good Catholic.

The couple married in 1992 and had a daughter together.

Magdaleno then had a tubal ligation. She thought she was done having children. But a few years later, things changed.

Anzaldo had only daughters, and the couple were getting older. He saw his chance at having a son slipping away.

“I wanted a son,” he said, “because I didn’t have one.”

Instead of bringing forth yet another welfare child into this world, I would like to give you a punch to your mansack, sir.  How about that?

Magdaleno too had always wanted a boy. Anzaldo paid for an operation to reverse Magdaleno’s tubal ligation. The couple thought they might return to Mexico after the child was born.

Anzaldo paid for the operation?  I seriously doubt that.

But for several years, she didn’t get pregnant, Magdaleno said.

So she asked a woman who returned periodically to Mexico to bring her back fertility drugs. The woman supplied her with various pills and injections over several years, Magdaleno said.

“I took a lot,” she said. “I don’t remember what they’re called.”

Finally, in 2002, Magdaleno got pregnant — with triplets.

And then there were six.

Talk of returning to Mexico ceased when their son, Alfredo, was born with hydrocephalus.

Their life became cramped and chaotic, with seven people crammed into their one-bedroom apartment. 

Gee.  I wonder how that happened.

Joanna, Magdaleno’s oldest daughter, now 20, dropped out of high school and moved out with a boyfriend about the time Magdaleno became pregnant with the triplets. She now works in a factory making dolls for Disneyland, her mother said.

It warms my heart to know that Angela and Anzaldo want the best for their children.

Now here is where the article becomes very interesting.  We’re going to discover what happened to Angela’s sisters after they moved from Los Angeles to Kentucky.  I don’t see how they honestly could survive.  I mean, these were illegal-immigrants who had no grasp of the English language.  They were strangers in a strange land.  They would be outcast.  Their lives would become a shambles as Kentuckians, filled to the brim with their proud southern heritage and known for their racist ways, would surely drive the Mexican immigrants from their great state.  Surely.

As Angela was having children, her siblings were undergoing a transformation of a different kind. They were slowly leaving Los Angeles.

Her sister Alejandra was the first to leave. In Los Angeles, she and her husband were barely able to make ends meet. As in Mexico, “there was little work and it’s poorly paid,” she said.

Eight years ago, she and her family moved to Kentucky, where a friend said there was more work and were fewer Mexican immigrants bidding down the wages for unskilled jobs.

While illegal immigration activists are shouting that illegals do not drive down wages, here is one who matter-of-factly speaks the truth.  Yes, illegal aliens drive down wages.  But be wary, dear readers.  It gets even worse for Alejandra.

In Kentucky, Alejandra picked tobacco. The work was hard and she didn’t know the language. But soon, life improved. Over the years, she invited her siblings to join her. One sister married a man who managed a Golden Corral, a chain of all-you-can-eat buffets. Soon several Magdaleno siblings were working in Golden Corrals. Their husbands found work installing windows and as farm-labor contractors. They went to night school to learn English because few people in Lexington speak Spanish.

Today, the Magdalenos in Lexington earn more than they did in Los Angeles, in a city where the cost of living is lower. Kentucky is now their promised land, and they talk about California the way they used to talk about Mexico.

Well, it didn’t get worse.  The Kentucky Magdelenos have done quite well for themselves.  Why?  Because they made a choice to assimilate.  They had to conform to the standards of the community in which they were residing in order to survive.  And guess what?  Their lives have improved significantly because of their assimilation.  That doesn’t mean that they’ve abandoned their culture.  It simply means they wanted to better themselves in their new home.  The Kentucky Magdelenos are living proof that assimilation is not difficult if illegal immigrants from Mexico abandon their peasant culture.

“What we weren’t able to do in many years in California,” Alejandra said, “we’ve done quickly here.

“We’re in a state where there’s nothing but Americans. The police control the streets. It’s clean, no gangs. California now resembles Mexico — everyone thinks like in Mexico. California’s broken.”

Again, a former illegal from Mexico spoke those words, and she speaks the honest truth.  If anyone believes we are not being invaded, simply make a trip to downtown Los Angeles.  There you will see how Mexico has been brought to this country piece by piece.  That’s just the way it is.  But it doesn’t have to be, as Alejandra and her Kentucky sisters have proven.

Justina was the last to leave Los Angeles, about the time Angela was pregnant with the triplets.

She and her husband wanted better schools for their sons, 15 and 9.

In Lexington, she said, “at the school there are just people who speak English. It’s helped my children a lot.” 

Congratulations Justina.  You are awesome.

Justina, who came to the U.S. with Magdaleno, applied for legal residency under the 1986 amnesty law and is now a U.S. citizen. Magdaleno never applied.

The sisters say they have urged Angela to come out to Kentucky — at least to visit. She said she hasn’t because her son has been hospitalized so much.

*Sigh*

This next portion of the article is another telling piece of skewed ethnological retention and culture shock, and once more, reveals how dishonest (or at least how out of touch) illegal immigration activists truly are.

Last year, however, she sent her daughter, Kelly, 17, to Kentucky for several months. Though American born and raised, Kelly hadn’t been outside South Los Angeles.

In Lexington, school was hard because few people spoke Spanish, and the city “barely had one Spanish radio station,” Kelly said.

God forbid!  You mean there are places in the United States where the predominant language isn’t Spanish?  That’s incomprehensible.

Her cousins, she said in English, “use more educational words than here. My cousin is 7 years old, and he has a better reading level than me. He don’t see picture books or drawings or anything like that. He just likes books with pure letters.”

Illegal aliens, and illegal immigration activists, take note of the above.  Amazing, huh?

Girls from Mexican-immigrant families in Kentucky, she saw, were in their mid-20s and still didn’t have children.

“I said, ‘Damn, that’s weird,’ ” Kelly said. “The girls right here in Los Angeles are like in Mexico. There are girls that are 14, they got kids.”

That makes me very sad.

The family in Kentucky “is more in the United States than” her mother, Kelly concluded. “They want a better education for the kids. With less kids there’s better possibility of you having something.”
It would make me very happy to see Kelly take this experience and try to improve herself based upon what she learned from her family in Kentucky–to see her assimilate and cultivate a life apart from Mexico and what she knows of her Los Angeles existence.  The American dream is not an illusion.  It is attainable.

Magdaleno, meanwhile, was raising six other children and using a variety of birth control methods — the latest being the contraceptive patch.

She said she was stunned when doctors told her that she was carrying quadruplets.

“She didn’t do this on purpose,” said Dr. Kathryn Shaw, who delivered the couple’s triplets and their quadruplets. “She was not at all elated, and not excited about the fact that they were quadruplets.”

Regardless, it seems fairly evident that Angela, whether she was fully aware of it or not, was still partaking in some sort of fertility program.  Perhaps she and Anzaldo only wanted one additional member of their family (by the way when do you realized you must stop?!  When you follow triplets with quadruplets?  Is that finally enough fucking kids?)

All are healthy, Shaw said, but weighed between 3 and 4 pounds at birth. They remained at White Memorial Medical Center in East Los Angeles long enough to gain weight, then came home this week.

Now Denise, Destiny, Andrew and Andrey are with the rest of the family.

For Angela Magdaleno, their arrival — 22 years after she left Mexico and entered the United States hoping for a different life — has brought her full circle. Her older daughters, like girls in Mexico, have been drafted into helping raise the new children.

“I don’t have anything,” she said. “Just children.”

And is that the Latino ideal of wealth as I’ve been told before?  Apparently not, as Angela here seems like she’s about ready to put a gun to her head.

Anyway, if anything, this article holds true to the idea that immigrant assimilation is the best means to achieve success in a foreign society.  There is no better testament to the contrary than the epic story of Angela, Anzaldo, and their brood who continue to suck from the state health-care, education, etc. teat, while simultaneously emptying legal residents’ pockets in the process.

I applaud the Magdeleno Kentuckians.  They did it right (apart from initially crossing the border illegally) and have become successful, contributing members of American society.

For Angela and Anzaldo, all I can offer is my pity.  You’ve already got my money.

Affection

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