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Archive for August 1st, 2006


Anyone who’s happened to stumble across this blog, without quickly clicking away of course, may have noticed how little credence I hold in the legion of 9/11 conspiracy theories that become more proliferate nearly every day. For the 9/11 conspirator, the burden of proof is immeasurably vast. Considering there’s an abundance of technical and scientific evidence (not to mention simple eye-witness accounts) pointing away from any overt conspiracy, such as the ever-popular direct U.S. government involvement, it just makes me wonder what could be going through the minds–perhaps a plethora of brain-altering drugs–of individuals who actually buy into a conspiracy of this magnitude when no evidence what-so-ever even points to such a preposterous connivance.

It seems conspiracy theories begin as a result of great emotional impact upon a person or persons who simply wish to garner some kind of sense out of events their collective minds struggle to understand. If people feel an event or events have not been properly explained to them, the inevitable theory of conspiracy may result. For some reason, the opposing yet superfluous evidence just can’t slither through the tightly clenched sutures of their skulls and sink into their brains. Is it more fun to be a nut? Apparently, especially when it conforms to a liberal bias, such as blaming Bush (a nut in his own right) and his/our government.

Yet when something fantastic and horrifying happens that does conform to the popular mindset, at this point in time, liberal leanings towards Israel and a dreadful bombing attack upon the southern Lebanese town of Qana a few days ago, no one thinks to question that perhaps something else might have been at work to the end that was that terrible circumstance where dozens of men, women, and children were killed in a building that collapsed hours after the bombing.

Granted, and not to compare the Qana bombing to 9/11, or make light of it, the impact isn’t on a scale that even comes close to matching September 11. Nonetheless, it was an important if sickening event in the hostilities that have been raging for weeks in the mid-east.

But why was the knee-jerk reaction to immediately point towards the Israeli forces as those responsible for those deaths? The obvious answer would be because the Israeli’s launched a few missiles towards Qana. The residents of the building in question had been repeatedly warned to leave the structure and relinquish the area because Israeli intelligence, arguably the best in the world, had spotted Hezbollah associates entering and exiting the zone in which the building stood. When the IDF tells you to leave the area, you had damn well better leave the area.

Missiles were launched at the building, but it took another seven hours for the building to finally collapse. There could be several evident reasons why this occurred–and the not so evident reason that should make conspiracy theorists the world over delight in newfound purpose. Odd that they have remained silent.

Here’s an excerpt from an article listed at the end of this blog entry.

Among the explanations for the time gap being studied are that the missile that hit the Qana building badly damaged the infrastructure, but the structure was held together for another seven hours and then collapsed of initial damages; or that the building housed weapons that exploded later, causing the structure to collapse.

Military officials say they are not ruling out the entry of a “third party” that detonated explosives seven hours later, although they have no information this occurred.

“I don’t want to get into conspiracy theories,” said Israeli Air Force chief of staff Amir Eshel. “We will work diligently and collect every detail, so as to understand what happened there. I hope that we will know in the end, but I’m not sure. It’s possible that we will never know what exactly happened there.”

The Israeli’s are dealing with a group of people who have never shown any fear of martyrdom–who have never shied away from strapping explosives to their bodies in the hopes that their individual death might result in a much higher cost paid by their enemies. As reprehensible as it sounds, should we also not explore the possibility that this same terrorist organization would be willing to sacrifice their own children to achieve the greater purpose–the eradication of the Zionists? I know not all terrorists participate in suicide attacks, but Palestinians and Hezbollah certainly have. This is a reality. It has happened before, and will inevitably happen again, and again, and again.

So that’s my conspiracy theory. Hezbollah sacrificed their own people, women and children included, for political purposes. Now of course I have no hard proof of this, but knowing even minimally how the terrorists operate, and the actions they have perpetrated over the years, I have no difficulty postulating such an unthinkable possibility. Anyway, that’s how conspiracy theorists think, right?

Photo

Then again, god forbid I exploit the issue.

Israel not to blame for Qana deaths?

Questions surround missile attack on building in south Lebanon


Posted: July 31, 2006
12:36 a.m. Eastern
By Aaron Klein
© 2006 WorldNetDaily.com

TEL AVIV – Israel might not be to blame for the collapse of a building yesterday in south Lebanon that reportedly killed 58 civilians, drawing worldwide condemnation and calls for an immediate end to the Jewish state’s attack on Hezbollah’s infrastructure, according to an initial investigation.

The Israel Air Force yesterday fired a missile at a building in the Lebanese town of Qana, believing the structure was used as a refuge by Hezbollah members.

The Israeli army last week and again this weekend warned Qana residents to vacate the area. Israeli drones picked up images of Hezbollah members entering and exiting the vicinity of the targeted building, military officials say. They said Hezbollah likely used the building to take refuge immediately following the launching of rockets from the area.

The missile was fired at the Qana building at 1 a.m. Lebanese time. According to scores of local reporters, the building collapsed at about 8 a.m. – leaving open a seven-hour gap military officials currently are attempting to analyze.

Two other missiles were fired in Qana during the seven-hour period, but the targets were hit correctly and were accounted for. Military officials ruled out the possibility a second Israeli missile struck the building seven hours after the initial strike.

Among the explanations for the time gap being studied are that the missile that hit the Qana building badly damaged the infrastructure, but the structure was held together for another seven hours and then collapsed of initial damages; or that the building housed weapons that exploded later, causing the structure to collapse.

Military officials say they are not ruling out the entry of a “third party” that detonated explosives seven hours later, although they have no information this occurred.

“I don’t want to get into conspiracy theories,” said Israeli Air Force chief of staff Amir Eshel. “We will work diligently and collect every detail, so as to understand what happened there. I hope that we will know in the end, but I’m not sure. It’s possible that we will never know what exactly happened there.”

Unexplained so far, according to military officials here, is why it took seven hours to evacuate the building after the missile strike.

“According to foreign press reports, and this is one of the reports we are relying on, the house collapsed at 8 a.m. We do not have testimony regarding the time of the collapse. If the house collapsed at 12 a.m., it is difficult for me to believe that they waited eight hours to evacuate it,” said Eshel.

Already the international community yesterday demanded an immediate end to Israel’s campaign in Lebanon, which began July 12 after Hezbollah ambushed an Israeli military patrol unit and kidnapped two soldiers. The terror group has since fired an average of 90 rockets per day at northern Israeli cities, killing 15 Israelis and wounding hundreds, some seriously. One-third of Israelis currently live under the threat of Hezbollah rockets.

United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan yesterday joined Lebanese leaders in calling for an unconditional cease-fire, which the United States rejected. The U.N. Security Council expressed “extreme shock and distress” over the attack on Qana attack.

The U.S., though, urged a temporary halt to hostilities in Lebanon, which Israel agreed to this morning, announcing a 48-hour period in which the Israeli Air Force will cease to bomb targets with the exception of strikes against Hezbollah rocket cells about to launch missiles.

Israel says it needs another 10-14 days to complete its military offensive in Lebanon, which aims to deal a severe blow to Hezbollah’s infrastructure. But political sources tell WND Israel is expecting a cease-fire to be implemented by the weekend.

“We now need to expedite our time period for this operation based on the political reality,” a military planner told WND. “I fear we are not going to have enough time to do what must be done to Hezbollah in Lebanon.”

Israel previously ended a military campaign against Hezbollah in Lebanon after an attack 10 years ago on Qana drew widespread condemnation. In April 1996, following a Hezbollah raid against the Jewish state, Israel launched an operation against Hezbollah positions in south Lebanon. But after the Israeli shelling of a U.N. peacekeepers base in Qana killed more than 100, the operation came to a swift end.

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